Category: blog prompts

Blog Prompt #7

For this blog prompt, peruse the work of a published writer and find at least three different examples of the stylistic variations discussed in the chapter. (Of course, I suggest that you use the work you will be discussing for…

Blog Prompt #6

What are you planning to do for your Research Project? Why? Explain in some detail what text you will be analyzing, its primary audience, and its purpose. Then, discuss which elements of the text you plan to analyze—sentence lengths and…

Blog Prompt #5 (S2013)

The fifth blog post is essentially the first portion of the proposal: Identify a specific topic and a working title for your final Research Paper and include the following information: A justification of the topic A specific research question If…

Blog Prompt #4 (S2013)

For this blog post, I am going to make you use the web site. Click on one of the posts in the RSS feeds to the left of this blog prompt–Daily Writing Tips, NY Times Grammar Blog, Grammarphobia, and Grammar…

Blog Prompt #3 (S2013)

Let’s use this blog prompt to get a start on your second analysis draft. Go through one of you papers and find two consecutive simple sentences. First, combine the sentences with a comma and a coordinating conjunction. Then, combine the…

Blog Prompt #8

Draft a body paragraph or two of your research project. The passage must contain an example from your primary text, your analysis, and a secondary source that supports your analysis in some way.

Blog Prompt #6

Complete #1 for Exercise 23 on page 154 of Rhetorical Grammar (our book). Never be an investor in something you don’t understand or in the dream of an artful salesperson of some product. Be a buyer, not a sellee. Figure…

Blog Prompt #5

Finally, here is the prompt for the fifth blog post. I meant to post this before break, but the web site has been down. Slowly but surely, I am getting it back to normal. Anyway, the fifth blog post is…

Blog Prompt #4 (S2012)

Identify the sentence patterns in your first analysis. How many of your sentences were simple sentences? How many were compound sentences? And so forth. Try combining some sentences and/or making compound sentences two simple sentences. How do the meanings change?