Blog Prompt #3 (Part #1: 2/1/2017 @ 11:59pm, Part #2: 2/6/2017)

Blog Prompt #3 will be completed in two parts. Complete step #1 before class on February 1 and complete step #2 before class on February 6.

Step #1

Choose one long paragraph or two shorter paragraphs you have written. (I suggest that you choose the paragraphs from the draft with which you are working for the second analysis assignment.) Identify all complex, compound, and compound-complex sentences and “pull apart” all clauses. From those clauses, create simple sentences by removing all associated punctuation and conjunctions. (Add periods, of course.) Finish up by removing all conjunctive adverbs.

Step #2

Review the posted paragraphs and choose one. Put Humpty Dumpty back together again. That is, using your best judgment, choose the simple sentences that you believe should be combined and combine them using subordination and coordination to create compound, complex and compound-complex sentences. If you would like to do so, feel free to create gerund and infinitive phrases as adverbials. Finish up by adding conjunctive adverbs as you deem appropriate.

Post the revised paragraph(s) as a reply to the comment before class on February 6. All posts should have at least one reply.

Step #1 Example

Kept But Not Posted

After I reviewed the first analysis, it was no surprise that I tend to use a high number of compound sentences. In fact, the number of compound sentences was nearly triple the number of simple sentences. Prior to this particular assignment, I already knew about my long-sentence style of writing because I try to put every fact, idea, or piece of information about something into the same sentence. This is so the reader can gain every bit of information about the subject before I move on with my writing. It would be very difficult for me to combine any of my short sentences because they are so few and far between and most of them came before and after compound sentences that were already much longer than the average sentence length.

Posted

I reviewed the first analysis. It was no surprise that I tend to use a high number of compound sentences. The number of compound sentences was nearly triple the number of simple sentences. Prior to this particular assignment, I already knew about my long-sentence style of writing. I try to put every fact, idea, or piece of information about something into the same sentence. This is so the reader can gain every bit of information about the subject. I then move on with my writing. It would be very difficult for me to combine any of my short sentences. They are so few and far between. Most of them came before and after compound sentences that were already much longer than the average sentence length.

The Coordinating Conjunctions

for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so

Some Subordinating Conjunctions

after, although, as, because, before, even if, even though, if, once, since, unless, until, when, whenever, where, while

Some Conjunctive Adverbs

accordingly, furthermore, moreover, similarly, also, hence, namely, still, anyway, however, nevertheless, then, besides, incidentally, next, thereafter, certainly, indeed, nonetheless, therefore, consequently, instead, now, thus, finally, likewise, otherwise, undoubtedly, further, meanwhile

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